The Detail is in the Devil

Rule 1, on page 1 of the book of war, is: “Do not march on Moscow”. Various people have tried it, Napoleon and Hitler, and it is no good. That is the first rule. I do not know whether your Lordships will know Rule 2 of war. It is: “Do not go fighting with your land armies in China”. It is a vast country, with no clearly defined objectives.

Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, House of Lords, 30 May 1962

Someone should come up with a similar quotation for all the BIM Lords out there, who battle vainly, usually on a daily basis, with superiors who insist on committing the equivalent BIM blunders as marching on Moscow or fighting with land armies in China.

One such BIM blunder is of the over-promise-and-under-deliver type. It is all too common for clients unfamiliar with the nitty gritty of BIM to believe the hype and think that just “because BIM” they will have a beautifully resolved and fully coordinated design. That “because computers” the design solutions presented to them will be of the highest calibre, unique, beautiful and hopefully award winning to boot. Simply put, that a blind faith in technology is the answer and will somehow overcome all the obstacles that still exist, and will continue to do so since nothing else has materially changed apart from using some fancy new software, is sure to disappoint. For example, the following question is taken from a masters level paper on algorithmic graphical environments:

Remember: resistance IS NOT futile…

The answer, in case you did not know it, has been helpfully highlighted in red. The blue grammar wiggle worms, although not deliberate, are actually helping to literally underline the pertinent points; that difficulty provides a clue and that maybe the problem did not exist in the first place. Furthermore, as item d) alludes to, machines are certainly not perfect because the humans designing them are not perfect. Flawless repetition should not be mistaken for perfection; repeating a mistake consistently one thousand times is still a mistake times one thousand! Confused? Ok, time for an analogy then.

The African Shoe Salesmen

Two friends, who happen to be shoe salesmen, go on holiday to a small African nation. One day they are being shown a local area by their tour guide when the first shoe salesmen suddenly remarks to the other, “We should open a shop here immediately! Think of the sales! Everyone has bare feet!” to which the second shoe salesmen says with a wry smile, “Don’t be foolish. We wouldn’t sell a thing. Nobody here wears shoes…”

What’s that? Still confused, you say? Not a clue what I’m gibbering on about? *deep breath* Fine. I’ll make it as simple as possible for you then.

Computers should be used for the tools they are. No more, no less. They should be used to assist where humans are weak (repetition, consistency) but not so much where humans are strong (creativity, originality). There is no magic. No secret sauce. There is input, there is output. The use of computers and fancy software, like Revit and Dynamo, is not in and of itself the solution to all our cost and productivity woes. In some ways the use of such tools is solving a problem that did not exist. Just like the shoe salesmen. It is adding complexity where none previously resided.

However, in just the same way that the internet has not entirely replaced the need for libraries, it has made researching and finding sources of knowledge (like this fine blog, for example) so much easier. The playing field has been levelled and opened right out. But public libraries are no less a source of knowledge than they ever were before. The contents of the books on the shelves was not suddenly devalued overnight by Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

So back to where this post started. Details and BIM blunders. A huge mistake, often made, is to somehow expect software to be the answer and for it to fix your difficult project. However, by adding an additional layer of complexity, I would argue that difficulty will only increase, costs are only likely to creep up further, and quality and timeliness will stubbornly refuse to improve. What it leads to are fancy shapes and fancy geometry but not necessarily better outcomes.

How to Avoid Fighting With Your Land Armies in China

The answer is, of course, to make information management central to all your processes. BIM is just a database and the same level of care and attention to detail should be applied to every input, just as it would be if you were filling out a phone contacts list. Would you double check the number you just entered and write the correct name and contact information, or would you just multi-copy-paste and assume everything went to plan? You’ve never copy-pasted and had unexpected results, like in, say, Excel? Never accidentally copied erroneous data from a header or footer, or missed a few lines of your target content? Never? Really? You surprise me. Are you a computer? Yes, of course you are, because that is exactly the kind of task that should be automated unless you want mistakes to creep in the nearer you get to 5pm on a Friday afternoon.

BIM skills 101: AtTeNtIoN tO dEtAiL

Email #1

From: BIM Weasel
Sent: Friday, 24 April
To: Important BIM Project Manager (IBPM)
Cc: Gary
Subject: Monthly report – example

IBPM,

In response to your previous comments on our monthly report, would the attached be more aligned with your expectations? I have copied in Gary to keep him informed.

Regards,

BIM Weasel


Email #2

From: IBPM
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: BIM Weasel
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

Hi BIM Weasel and Gary,

Went through your attached document a couple of times, we are unsure of which previous comments of ours were you referring to.

As the file name suggested, it is a comparison report between two reference projects (Project A and Project B), and appears to be showing:

Quality checking of BIM model (The report says the quality check of the BIM model by comparing it with some other reference projects.) and

Summary of improvement, regarding modelling and drawings generation, the combined model or individual models of different disciplines can be made (mainly those generalized in Section 2, with examples under Section 4 in the report).

Cheers

IBPM


Email #3

From: BIM Weasel
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: IBPM
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

IBPM,

Sorry to give you the run around, but I thought that I made it clear that what I sent was only an EXAMPLE and is actually taken from another project (with sensitive details redacted). Since your previous comments majored around your opinion that the monthly report was more of a plan, the point of sending an example was to get your response on the general approach and tone before reconfiguring our monthly report. I think that some parts of our report are still relevant (such as the referencing of monthly meeting minutes, to show the actual issues that were discussed), but the format and content could be rearranged more inline with the example I sent you and Gary.

Bearing in mind the above, is my example more or less aligned with your expectations?

Regards,

BIM Weasel


Email #4

From: IBPM
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: BIM Weasel
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

Hi BIM Weasel and Gary,

Your intention of the example is noted.

Generally, presentation using tables make reporting effectively, easier to track and lives easier for all. Any particulars can then the written and described, and things like meeting notes (sic – such attention to detail here too – BIM Weasel)

I am sure that there are reference samples which George might be able to share with you as references, of course with any sensitive matters should be redacted where necessary. George, please kindly look into this.

Please draft out a table of content for the Monthly Report to get things moving. In terms of the “tone” or “polishing needed” of the report, George should be able to help similar to that of your draft R to C on the BIM Plan.

Please feel free to call and discuss with me on this matter.

Many thanks

IBPM


Email #5

From: BIM Weasel
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: IBPM;
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

Thank you IBPM, Gary,

Just one question; who is George?

Regards,

BIM Weasel

Get me the turds/hour analytics, STAT!

Sometimes you wonder if the people writing project BIM requirements are taking the piss. I can excuse the LOD 600 requirement that was included in an RFP a while back as plain ignorance, or even an affectionate Spinal Tap tribute. But when Toilet Data is included in the list of requirements for future property management in the BMS system, you have to wonder why?

The befuddled BIM hero who sent in this contribution suggested a potential use “I can imagine the top management wanting live dashboards giving them Tph (Turds per hour) metrics, so they can fine tune the thickness of the canteen sandwiches…”

When is a Questionnaire not a Questionnaire?

Consulting for the lazy

Hong Kong’s Construction Industry Council (CIC) are tasked with implementing the government’s BIM initiatives and have employed US bean counter led engineering consultancy AECOM to drive the development of a case requirement study for 3D and BIM Data.

Never one to spend a dollar on a task if they can get someone else to do it, and gain an unfair advantage at the same time, AECOM have basically asked the BIM people invited to make up their own questions, to provide them with valuable data that would allow them to bid for and win future projects more efficiently.

Tell us what you know about BIM, so we can do it better. Example 1

Not content with finding out what you know, they also want to find out what would make their bids more effective for future projects by identifying gaps in the current processes they can exploit and wow the clients with their boundless knowledge and BIM chops.

All your base are belong to us

Much BIM. So Collaborate

Clients who know nothing about BIM Part 1.

This wishy-washy BIM requirements “specification” is taken from the terms of reference for a major expansion to an airport terminal. This is the entirety of the BIM requirements for the project.

The could have just put in a clause, “just give us some BIM please”.

Such BIM

Fool me once, shame on — shame on you

Shame on you

It never ceases to amaze how badly organised some larger companies are. Here’s an example of an HR drone’s shotgun approach to recruitment, sending a mail about a job to a BIM warrior who left the company a few month’s earlier, and who is currently employed in a more senior role. I’d like to think this was an isolated incident, but FFS I received a similar mail a few weeks later.

Fool me twice

Let’s get things started

 

Yes Gordon, it is as bad as it looks
Yes Gordon, it is as bad as it looks

To get things started, the BIM Weasel sent me this email exchange recently, which demonstrates a promising level of BIM fuckwittery from the Project Manager.

From: Manager, Project 
To: Weasel, BIM <bim.weasel@*******.com>; Engineer, Lead <lead.engineer@*******.com>
Subject: RE: New Project BIM PxP – essential reading

Lead Engineer,

There is no need for you to read this document.

Regards

PM

From: Weasel, BIM
To: Engineer, Lead <lead.engineer@*******.com>
Cc: Manager, Project <project.manager@*******.com>
Subject: New Project BIM PxP – essential reading

Lead Engineer,

May I suggest that you read the following document carefully, if you have not already done so? It is central to the proper delivery of this project: New Project (Airport Stuff) – BIM PXP.pdf

Regards,

The BIM Weasel

Digital Delivery Specialist