Ye Olde BIM

“In days of old, when knights were bold, and toilets weren’t invented, they dug a hole and did a roll and went away contented”

BIM Weasel, May 2020
Sorry, I fell asleep on the bog. Did I miss something?

Specifying BIM workstations is, for want of a better term, a movable feast. Constantly changing software offerings from vendors, myriad file formats, inevitable interoperability issues, a plethora of hardware choices; all this before you even enter into the human operator realm, being all squishy and organic and capable of errors and glitches completely lacking in consistency. And we haven’t even mentioned budget yet…

Given all these potential complications, the sensible choice would be to do some basic research to establish the most common hardware configurations from leading workstation suppliers, keep abreast of computer infrastructure industry developments, and trace a line back from the “bleeding edge” to a more affordable place on the graph. Essentially, you want your best “bang for buck” coupled with an element of future proofing. Anything too fresh is untested and likely to cost you an arm and a leg, whilst anything too old is likely to run into compatibility and support issues before long. You want your new machines to survive at least one project before upgrading, right? Well, you’d think so.

Apparently there is another train of thought out there that I have chosen to call “Ye Olde BIM” in that it has more of a medieval approach to technology adoption. After all, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, yeah? Yeah. Sure thing my liege.

Excerpt of BIM scope for a project in the month of May in the year of our Lord 2020. Yes. Quite.

The example above is taken from a project tender specification for a development in 2020. The year 2020. Weapon of choice; Autodesk Revit 2011. So for a project that may take a couple of years to complete, it makes absolutely perfect sense to specify software and hardware requirements that were looking long in the tooth at least 5 or 6 years ago. But surely by now all those bugs would have been fixed, right? Well, yes but actually no. That just isn’t how the industry operates.

Yeah, but no, but yeah, but…

It is only the latest iterations that get the latest productivity enhancements incorporated into them, along with introducing all the new and exciting bugs, as the product moves forward. Older versions are left behind and eventually no longer supported. Cast adrift, as it were. The development of complex software, like Autodesk Revit, needs to be carried along like a boat on a river of license fees. Actually more of an ocean of license fees. Software development is expensive! To extend the analogy to the example above, specifying 2011 software for a project starting in 2020 is the equivalent of clinging on to a fancy wardrobe that fell overboard during a storm en route and assuming that you’ll still get to your intended destination in a timely manner. Sure, you can do that, I suppose, and you’ll probably reach the shore eventually, but don’t expect to have quite the same experience as the paying passengers in comfortable cabins, being served fine wine by Autodesk waiters, leaving you behind in their wake…

Coming up in the next thrilling instalment of BIM Bollocks; how to generate complex geometry with the use of just an abacus. I jest of course… Or do I?

BIM skills 101: AtTeNtIoN tO dEtAiL

Email #1

From: BIM Weasel
Sent: Friday, 24 April
To: Important BIM Project Manager (IBPM)
Cc: Gary
Subject: Monthly report – example

IBPM,

In response to your previous comments on our monthly report, would the attached be more aligned with your expectations? I have copied in Gary to keep him informed.

Regards,

BIM Weasel


Email #2

From: IBPM
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: BIM Weasel
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

Hi BIM Weasel and Gary,

Went through your attached document a couple of times, we are unsure of which previous comments of ours were you referring to.

As the file name suggested, it is a comparison report between two reference projects (Project A and Project B), and appears to be showing:

Quality checking of BIM model (The report says the quality check of the BIM model by comparing it with some other reference projects.) and

Summary of improvement, regarding modelling and drawings generation, the combined model or individual models of different disciplines can be made (mainly those generalized in Section 2, with examples under Section 4 in the report).

Cheers

IBPM


Email #3

From: BIM Weasel
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: IBPM
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

IBPM,

Sorry to give you the run around, but I thought that I made it clear that what I sent was only an EXAMPLE and is actually taken from another project (with sensitive details redacted). Since your previous comments majored around your opinion that the monthly report was more of a plan, the point of sending an example was to get your response on the general approach and tone before reconfiguring our monthly report. I think that some parts of our report are still relevant (such as the referencing of monthly meeting minutes, to show the actual issues that were discussed), but the format and content could be rearranged more inline with the example I sent you and Gary.

Bearing in mind the above, is my example more or less aligned with your expectations?

Regards,

BIM Weasel


Email #4

From: IBPM
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: BIM Weasel
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

Hi BIM Weasel and Gary,

Your intention of the example is noted.

Generally, presentation using tables make reporting effectively, easier to track and lives easier for all. Any particulars can then the written and described, and things like meeting notes (sic – such attention to detail here too – BIM Weasel)

I am sure that there are reference samples which George might be able to share with you as references, of course with any sensitive matters should be redacted where necessary. George, please kindly look into this.

Please draft out a table of content for the Monthly Report to get things moving. In terms of the “tone” or “polishing needed” of the report, George should be able to help similar to that of your draft R to C on the BIM Plan.

Please feel free to call and discuss with me on this matter.

Many thanks

IBPM


Email #5

From: BIM Weasel
Sent: Tuesday, 5 May
To: IBPM;
Cc: Gary
Subject: RE: Monthly report – example

Thank you IBPM, Gary,

Just one question; who is George?

Regards,

BIM Weasel

Get me the turds/hour analytics, STAT!

Sometimes you wonder if the people writing project BIM requirements are taking the piss. I can excuse the LOD 600 requirement that was included in an RFP a while back as plain ignorance, or even an affectionate Spinal Tap tribute. But when Toilet Data is included in the list of requirements for future property management in the BMS system, you have to wonder why?

The befuddled BIM hero who sent in this contribution suggested a potential use “I can imagine the top management wanting live dashboards giving them Tph (Turds per hour) metrics, so they can fine tune the thickness of the canteen sandwiches…”

Digital Twins – The new, unwanted buzzword

First there was “Virtual Building“, a Graphisoft trademark they use to differentiate between ArchiCAD and what was referred to as “Flat CAD”, the 2D drafting board analogue from Autodesk, which was launched the same year as the visionary Hungarian BIM tool’s first iteration, Radar CH.

Next there was BIM, Building Information Modelling, coined by Autodesk in their 2002 white paper, attributed to Phil Bernstein.

Software vendors love a hype wave to follow, re-branding their tired old products with the latest buzzword to try and shift more licenses by scaring customers into thinking they will miss the wave and lose out to competitors. “SuperDuperCAD-X, the market leading CAD/Virtual Building/BIM/Level 3/VDC/Digital Engineering/DfMA authoring tool is now leading the way in Digital Twin capability!”

For years they were banging on about BIM will reduce costs by 50% but all that happened was a “BIM Team” was created in the business, and then treated like “drafters”, glorified tracers (if you don’t know what is a tracer, ask one of the old guys in your organisation). As there was zero engagement between the engineering teams and these BIM jockeys, designs being done in 2D, even drawn up in 2D CAD before handing over to the BIM guys to do their stuff. You might as well have thrown money down the toilet.

BIM added costs without benefits. And now there is Digital Twins.

The thing is, we already have digital twins, in scenarios where it makes commercial sense and add value. A digital twin of a building is just bollocks. The cost of setting up and maintaining a digital twin with all the sensors and stuff is significant, and to be honest, you don’t really need a fully detailed BIM model to make use of it. Just some floor plans, PDFs.

The CAD companies promoting Digital Twins will be really pissed when the market decides they don’t need all that BIM modelling bullshit and just need dashboards and databases.

When is a Questionnaire not a Questionnaire?

Consulting for the lazy

Hong Kong’s Construction Industry Council (CIC) are tasked with implementing the government’s BIM initiatives and have employed US bean counter led engineering consultancy AECOM to drive the development of a case requirement study for 3D and BIM Data.

Never one to spend a dollar on a task if they can get someone else to do it, and gain an unfair advantage at the same time, AECOM have basically asked the BIM people invited to make up their own questions, to provide them with valuable data that would allow them to bid for and win future projects more efficiently.

Tell us what you know about BIM, so we can do it better. Example 1

Not content with finding out what you know, they also want to find out what would make their bids more effective for future projects by identifying gaps in the current processes they can exploit and wow the clients with their boundless knowledge and BIM chops.

All your base are belong to us

Much BIM. So Collaborate

Clients who know nothing about BIM Part 1.

This wishy-washy BIM requirements “specification” is taken from the terms of reference for a major expansion to an airport terminal. This is the entirety of the BIM requirements for the project.

The could have just put in a clause, “just give us some BIM please”.

Such BIM

Fool me once, shame on — shame on you

Shame on you

It never ceases to amaze how badly organised some larger companies are. Here’s an example of an HR drone’s shotgun approach to recruitment, sending a mail about a job to a BIM warrior who left the company a few month’s earlier, and who is currently employed in a more senior role. I’d like to think this was an isolated incident, but FFS I received a similar mail a few weeks later.

Fool me twice

Let’s get things started

 

Yes Gordon, it is as bad as it looks
Yes Gordon, it is as bad as it looks

To get things started, the BIM Weasel sent me this email exchange recently, which demonstrates a promising level of BIM fuckwittery from the Project Manager.

From: Manager, Project 
To: Weasel, BIM <bim.weasel@*******.com>; Engineer, Lead <lead.engineer@*******.com>
Subject: RE: New Project BIM PxP – essential reading

Lead Engineer,

There is no need for you to read this document.

Regards

PM

From: Weasel, BIM
To: Engineer, Lead <lead.engineer@*******.com>
Cc: Manager, Project <project.manager@*******.com>
Subject: New Project BIM PxP – essential reading

Lead Engineer,

May I suggest that you read the following document carefully, if you have not already done so? It is central to the proper delivery of this project: New Project (Airport Stuff) – BIM PXP.pdf

Regards,

The BIM Weasel

Digital Delivery Specialist